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Microsoft may remove the old-school volume mixer from future Windows 10 builds


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Since the release of Windows 10, many critics have pointed to the befuddling manner in which various settings are accessed as one of the major pain points for the OS, with both the Settings app and the old school Control Panel from Windows 7 hosting an array of different options and toggles.

Microsoft has been working on consolidating these options for a while now, and the latest change in this regard seems to be the volume mixer panel that you can currently access by right-clicking on the speaker icon on the taskbar. It allows you to manually configure the volume for each application without adjusting the master volume.

As spotted by some users, Microsoft has removed this legacy panel from the latest build released to Windows Insider on the Fast Ring. Now, using the same shortcut directs users to a similar page in the modern Settings app. The page has been there for a while, but this is the first time that Microsoft has decided to entirely override the old pane with its modern equivalent.

Just as with the previous setup, you can still manually adjust the volume for each app, as well as set the master volume. You also get the option to change the sound input and outputs for each app individually. So, you could, for example, run the browser off your speakers, while playing music through your headphones, which is quite the nifty addition that can't be found on the legacy volume mixer.

The old mixer hasn't been entirely removed, though. Currently, only the shortcut stated above has been modified to direct you to the Settings app; you can still find the old dialog box through the Control Panel. The change may, however, be the first step to Microsoft eventually deprecating the pane from future Windows builds.